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#1 2018-10-12 06:14:44

zhangzk
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Registered: 2018-02-22
Posts: 101

it would have been a film

EAST RUTHERFORD Michael Palardy Jersey , N.J. (AP) — Being the oldest player on the New York Giants, Eli Manning can smile talking about the generational gap between him and some of his younger teammates.

Many of the so-called kids on the team were in grade school when Manning was taken with the first pick of the 2004 draft.

Some such as halfback and recent No. 2 overall pick Saquon Barkley were still in grade school when the quarterback won his first of two Super Bowl MVPs in February 2008.

And things certainly are different now. The music has morphed. The games played on the cell phones and tablets are more advanced. Phrases used in speech have changed. Dancing on the field and in the locker room is more prevalent.

“There’s a lot of dancing going on, a lot of dancing, which, I find very curious,” Manning, 37, said Tuesday after the Giants practiced for their annual preseason game against the Jets. “The music, I miss out on some of the music and social media, some of the things they’re on. For the most part, I can figure it out.”

Building relationships and putting the team first is what Manning has been all about entering his 15th NFL season.

While he is certainly more laid back than most of his teammates, Manning likes to reach out to the young men. He is notorious for taking their phones and changing the language to a foreign one.

Some players have caught on, though. Odell Beckham Jr. no longer uses 13-13 as his passcode to the cell phone, and other have chosen more intricate passwords. Manning is looking to get around that.

“You’ve got to have fun with them and connect with them,” Manning said. “There’s times where it is serious and you’re talking ball, they always know by the way I approach them whether I have something serious to talk about, a route or a concept or something. There’s (also) times where we get to goof off and kind of get to know the lighter side of them.”

Manning jokes that he is doing a lot more dancing to connect with a younger crowd that includes Beckham, Barkley, wide receiver Sterling Shepard and tight end Evan Engram, all 25 and under.

“I think I have a good relationship with all the guys, and I’m not trying to act like I’m 22, I act my age and make fun of myself a lot, and they add to it probably and so that’s fine,” Manning said. “I’m good with that.”

Manning’s focus remains football. In recent days, he and Beckham have walked away from 11-on-11 drills between second teamers to work on pass routes and things they did not connect on in practice.

Beckham Fred Warner Color Rush Jersey , who missed most of last season with a broken ankle, has not lost a step, Manning said.

“We’ve had game experience together,” Manning said. “Now Saquon, that’s different, just because he’s a rookie and missing some valuable time. So, I know he’s getting mental reps. It’s different than practice reps, it’s different than game reps. Hopefully, he can get back soon.”

Barkley has missed more than a week with a hamstring injury and it looks unlikely he will play Friday.

For Manning, the rivalry game with the Jets is nothing more than probably his last game before the season opener against Jacksonville on Sept. 9 at home.

“I look at it as the third preseason game and a chance for us to go out there and play for an extended period, against a good defense and a good team,” Manning said. “You want to go out there and execute well and feel good about where you are.”

Manning played two series in the preseason opener against Cleveland and led the team to a field goal. Shurmur rested him last Friday for the game in Detroit against the Lions.

“He kind of told me early on I probably wouldn’t play,” Manning said. “So, I knew I had to get the most out of the practices with Detroit, which I thought we got some good work. I always want to be out there and play, but I understand it. I look forward to this week getting out there.”

Putting together a documentary of a Super Bowl season is an extensive and exhausting project.

Except when it becomes a labor of love.

For dozens of employees at NFL Films, the 2017 Philadelphia Eagles season was particularly special. Thus, the DVD that chronicles it and becomes available to the public on Tuesday – PHI-NALLY is how it is dubbed – wasn’t exactly work.

”We are in Mount Royal, New Jersey, which is about 20 minutes from the Linc,” says Todd Schmidt, who produces such enterprises for NFL Films. ”So many of our people are lifelong fans of the Eagles, who have suffered for all those years. And that is something the becomes part of the film; we wanted people out there to understand what some of these people went through during that crazy game and this season.

”I would love for an Arizona Cardinals fan to get the same bang out of this as my 22-year-old son and a lifelong Eagles fan will, and I like to think that the story will do that. This is more than a story of a football season. It’s about why teams and fans don’t quit, and that’s what Philly fans are like. They may get a lot of criticism http://www.billsauthorizedshops.com/aut … nes-jersey , but there’s a reason Rocky means so much and showing the heart to never give up means so much.”

NFL Films had the good fortune of being able to place microphones on coach Doug Pederson and quarterback Nick Foles. The exchanges between them not only are insightful football-wise, they provide a window into the aggressiveness that was so critical to not only upending the Patriots in a classic Super Bowl, but in the Eagles putting together such a successful season.

Indeed, Philadelphia’s 41-33 victory in Minneapolis probably made for a much more enchanting story than had the Patriots won. After all, New England taking the NFL title is anything but new, and the Eagles last won it in 1960, when Norm Van Brocklin was the quarterback and Chuck Bednarik was playing linebacker and center.

So Schmidt opted to open the documentary with a shot of Franklin Field on the University of Pennsylvania campus – the site of that 1960 win over Green Bay. And he decided to close the film with the parade witnessed by more than 700,000 ”so you get a clear idea of what this meant to the city of Philadelphia, the people of Philadelphia, and to Eagles fans.”

NFL Films actually makes two 55-minute films annually. The 2017 version of the Patriots’ season ”will not see the light of day,” Schmidt explains. But it also would have had plenty of cachet.

”I think every team has a story,” he says, though how many viewers would be interested in, say, the Browns‘ 0-16 campaign is debatable.

”Had the Patriots won, it would have been a film of dominance; if they had won they would have been the `27 Yankees. It would have been magnificent if they had pulled out that game, two of the most amazing Super Bowls back to back. Tom Brady would go down as the greatest magician ever to walk the earth.

”We are storytellers and we would have made the elements we had work well.”

Still, the elements they had on Philadelphia’s side certainly seem more compelling. A team loses five key players, including late in the schedule the QB who appeared headed to league MVP honors. It’s an underdog in all of its postseason games despite being a top seed. Its history of falling short is monumental.

And then it wins a classic Super Bowl against an NFL dynasty.

”The Eagles story has a lot more historical context, which is red meat to a storyteller,” Schmidt says. ”The more context and unique elements of the story, the better the story. So I loved the Eagles story.”

As did so many of his co-workers.

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2018-10-12 06:14:44

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